Hands Off

They (whoever “they” are) always say to try to find the good in a bad situation…well I found the good in our swine flu pandemic. I read that some people are stopping shaking hands…finally! I wrote a post about this awhile back where I had stated we have to get rid of that tradition…it’s just too germ infested! And yes, some cities are asking people to stop germ passing…I mean shaking hands.  In NY City some schools are banning “high fives”. Years ago, if someone went to high five me, I would do it with the back of my hand. I guess I was way ahead of the times. Some churches are stopping hand holding during the Lord’s Prayer…now that’s serious! On a scale of 1-10 (10 being a total germaphobe) I give myself a 6 or 7, so I will shake a hand if extended but I loathe it every time. I would prefer a smile; no germs passed from that!

We all know Anna Post, the etiquette expert (what makes her an expert, I’m not sure) but this is what she says about the subject-

If you can’t bring yourself to shake hands, simply tell the person what a handshake is meant to convey. Say something like, “excuse me for not shaking your hand, but it’s a pleasure to meet you”.  She also says “don’t pull out the Purell right away”…wait until you get back to your desk or your meeting is over.

So do we agree with the expert? Swine flu or no swine flu, sorry but I really don’t want to shake your hand.

p.s – Damn, I wish I had taken stock out in hand sanitizers.

 

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3 Responses

  1. According to the US National Institute of Health “Seasonal influenza causes more than 200,000 hospitalizations and 41,000 deaths in the U.S. every year, and is the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S.”

    I got the flu shot because I work in retail, see a lot of people, and handle a lot of cash. My insurance covered the shot, but if I was one of those 200k hospitalized I am sure they would not cover all those expenses. I also dont wanna die, at least not yet, haha.

  2. And here is the link to that quotation: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18679129

  3. what about hugs?

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